Molchat Doma @ Scala | 24.02.20

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We saw the incredible Molchat Doma in London as part of their Storm Over Europe Tour Part II, which (with almost every show sold out) saw them doing exactly that.

Molchat Doma @ Scala | 24.02.20

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Molchat Doma @ Scala | 24.02.20

We saw the incredible Molchat Doma in London as part of their Storm Over Europe Tour Part II, which (with almost every show sold out) saw them doing exactly that.

Originally destined for Moth Club which sold out, and then Studio 9294 which promptly did the same, Молчат Дома (Molchat Doma)'s London show was finally upgraded to Scala. A venue upgrade that parallels their second album having to be repressed six times as every pressing sold out.

Not bad for a barely-three-year-old synthwave band.

The darkness of their industrial beats was betrayed by how surprisingly danceable their songs are live, and how much they clearly enjoy playing them. The trio's bassist (Pavel Kozlov) and guitarist (Roman Komogortsev) also cover synth and drum machine, but front man Egor Shkutko's magnetic presence is reserved for vocals alone.

The melodies roamed between post punk, pure pop and the rumbles of throat-singing monks, showing their leanings towards the brighter side of darkwave. And honestly, it was incredible.

As the show progressed we delved deeper into acid beats and strobe lights, as the band commanded an audience who had no idea of a single lyric. With Egor either stood serene in front of a frantic, whirling crowd as his bandmates thrashed around him; or dancing like Courtney Cox in a Bruce Springsteen video.

Their live show was, as their two albums are. Deep, powerful, meaningful. From start to finish.

All images taken from Molchat Doma's Facebook page. Sacred Bones is reissuing their first two albums, С крыш наших домов (S Krysh Nashikh Domov)and Этажи (Etazhi).

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